alfalfa - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

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Split Pea Pesto Spread










alfalfa vegetarian recipes

Danish Summer Tacos

July 8 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Danish Summer Tacos Here is an unconventional but yet great taco recipe that we want you to try. It includes making tortillas from grated zucchini/­­courgette and filling them with a creamy and crunchy yogurt, cucumber and potato salad. Think of it as a light and summery take on tacos that probably will drive taco conservatives mad but make the rest of us happy. Because one more way to eat taco is not a bad thing. The zucchini tortillas is a recipe we have been making for the past couple of months, using egg, almond flour and parmesan to bind them together. We first saw this idea floating around on various Pinterest boards. If you have been making our vegetable flatbreads, this is a thinner version that is more elastic (mainly because of the cheese) and therefore works great as a soft tortilla shell or wrap. The creamy yogurt salad is our version of a Danish summer salad (sommersalat). It is traditionally made on smoked fresh cheese, creme fraiche, radishes, cucumber and chives and it is a classic summer dish, served on top of a sm?rrebr?d or inside a sandwich. We have upgraded the traditional version with strawberry, apple, dill, parsley and cooked potatoes and it is truly a delightful combination of flavors and textures. The sweet and fruity notes works very well with the fresh herbs and cooked sliced potatoes. It is pretty difficult to come by smoked fresh cheese if you live outside of Denmark so our version instead has full fat yogurt, lemon juice and dill. If you do find smoked fresh cheese you should definitely replace half of the yogurt with it in this recipe. We are actually writing this from Denmark as we are spending a few summer weeks with our Danish family so apart from smoked cheese, we will also be feasting on r?dgr?d med fl?de, sm?rrebr?d and p?laegschokolade. Leave us a comment if you give this a try, we’d love to hear what you think. Happy summer! Danish Summer Zucchini Tacos Makes 6 Zucchini Tortillas 2 zucchini (4 cups grated) 1 large egg 1/­­2 cup loosely packed grated parmesan cheese 25 g /­­ 1/­­4 cup almond flour sea salt & pepper Danish summer salad 4 cooked new potatoes 1/­­2 cucumber 4 radishes 6 small tomatoes 10 strawberries, pitted 1 apple, cored 4 stems dill 4 stems parsley 1 cup thick plain yogurt 2 tbsp mayonaise (optional) 1/­­2 lemon, juice sea salt & pepper For assembling 6 crispy lettuce 6 tbsp alfalfa sprouts Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Grate the zucchini on the roughest side of a box grater. Place in a sieve and squeeze out any excess water from the grated zucchini. Transfer to a mixing bowl and combine with a whisked egg, grated cheese, almond flour, salt and pepper. Measure out 60 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup of batter for each flatbread, place on the baking paper and use the palm of your hand to shape them into flat discs. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes until golden and firm. Cut potatoes, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes, strawberries and apple into small cubes and transfer to a mixing bowl. Finely chop dill and parsley. In another bowl stir together dill, parsley, yogurt, mayonaise, lemon juice, salt and pepper and add to the cubed ingredient bowl. Gently combine so all ingredients are covered in the herby yogurt mixture. When the zucchini tacos/­­tortillas have cooled slightly, place a lettuce in each and 2 spoonfuls of summer salad and top with sprouts. Serve immediately.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches

July 12 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches Sm?rrebr?d - an open-faced rye sandwich that is piled high with toppings - is one of the most essential dishes in the Danish culture, most commonly eaten for lunch instead of a warm dish. Traditionally, many of the toppings involve poultry, fish and meat, but here we are showing a few of our vegetarian favourites along with some more contemporary versions. The recipes aren’t as specific as usual since sandwiches rarely call for detailed instructions. We merely hope to open your senses and get you inspired to try something else than just a regular butter and cheese sandwich. This is also a fun way to do a buffet. Bake or buy a good quality sourdough rye bread (or paleo bread for a flour free option). Then prepare a table with as many toppings as you can come up with and let every guest build their own open-faced sandwich. New potatoes & pickled onion sandwich We love a good ol’ potato sandwich with mâche lettuce, mayo, quick pickled red onions, chives and dill. Use new potatoes if they are in season and remember that you don’t need to peel them, just rinse to remove any dirt and place whole into a pan of lightly salted water, bring to the boil, simmer for about 10-15 minutes or until tender. Then drain and leave to cool. Here is how we make our own quick pickled red onion: Mix 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) rice vinegar or white wine vinegar with 1 tsp honey and 1/­­2 tsp salt and 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds or cumin seeds. Then we slice up 1 red onion thinly and pour boiling water over the slices before placing them in a jar with the vinegar. After 30 minutes it already tastes divine. Creamy curried egg salad sandwich This creamy curried egg salad is so typical Danish. We serve it on rye bread with small cherry tomatoes, chives and alfalfa sprouts. It can get a little messy when you eat it, but don’t let that intimidate you. Here is how you make the egg salad: Place 4 eggs in a pan and cover with water, bring to the boil and set the timer for 8 minutes, lower the heat and let simmer. After 8 minutes, remove from the heat and place under running cold water. When the eggs are cold, crack and peel. In a bowl, stir together 2 tbsp mayo, 2 tbsp yogurt (or more mayo instead), 1 tsp curry powder and a pinch of salt. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Now chop the boiled eggs and gently fold them into the curry dressing. Avo & Za’atar The new queen of open-faced sandwiches and also one of the most popular subjects on instagram. Avocado is not a traditional Danish sm?rrebr?d toppings but always a welcome addition to our table. The key to this rye recipe is to use really ripe avocados. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone, scoop out the avocado flesh with a spoon and slice very finely. Place each half on two slices of rye bread and give each avo a gentle mash with your hand. We have served this open-faced avo sandwich with thin slices of radishes and a sprinkle of our favourite spice Za’atar. Red bell pepper & Rosemary spread Lots of people have been asking us for a plant based spread to use on sandwiches. This popular recipe from our first book is one of our favourites. Apart from putting on a sandwich, it’s also great as a side to most dishes or together with pasta or zoodles. Here is how we make our spread: Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Cut 3 large red bell peppers in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking tray. Roast for 40 minutes until slightly charred. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Add 2/­­3 cup (75 g) sunflower seeds, a pinch of cayenne and a pinch of salt to a frying-pan and toast for a few minutes on medium heat. Peel the skin from the peppers, chop and put in a blender. Add the sunflower seeds, 2 tbsp lemon juice and 2 sprigs rosemary and purée on high speed. Put in an airtight glass jar. Will keep in the fridge for up to two weeks. Hazelnut butter & Strawberries Not all our sandwiches are savoury. This is a modernised version of the classic peanut butter & jam sandwich. Hazelnut butter, sliced strawberries, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, a sprinkle of bee pollen and some fresh basil. Delish! Buy nut or seed butter in stores or make your own (try this recipe).

Pita Sandwich with homemade Hummus spread

October 9 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

Pita Sandwich with homemade Hummus spread Recipe submitted by Sonal Pita Sandwich with homemade Hummus spread is a happy, healthy, quick and delicious sandwich! This is one of my favorites. Ingredients: for Sandwich - Pocket pita bread – cut into half - Cheddar cheese slice (optional) – 1 - Hummus – 2 tablespoons (recipe below) - Alfalfa sprouts – 1/­­4 cup - Avocado – 2 slices - Tomato – 2 slices - Cucumber 2 slices - Lettuce – 1 leaf - Jalapeno (optional) – deseeded, cut – 1-2 small slices - Olive oil – 1/­­4 teaspoon for Hummus - Garbanzo beans – 2 1/­­2 cups - Tahini – 3-4 tablespoon - Olive oil – 2 tablespoons - Lemon juice – 2 tablespoons - Garlic – 4 cloves (roasting is optional) - Coriander powder – 1 tablespoon - Salt – to taste - Water – as necessary (no more than 1/­­2 cup) Method First Make hummus as follows: - Soak garbanzo beans overnight (or use canned garbanzo beans, for which, no soaking required). - If using fresh, add some salt and pressure cook until soft. - Puree the garbanzo beans in a blender, gradually adding, tahini paste (available in most grocery stores), peeled garlic, coriander powder, salt (if needed), lemon juice, and water, one after the other. - The mixture can be made either very smooth or a little coarse. - Remove it in a bowl, add olive oil, mix. Now, assemble the Sandwich: - Cut the pocket pita bread into half, make pocket and put the cheese slice inside. - Brush the top of the pita bread with olive oil (optional) - Heat it for a few minutes in toaster oven, till the cheese starts melting. - Remove from the toaster, spread hummus, add lettuce, tomato, cucumber, avocado slices and alfafa sprouts and top it with jalape?o (optional). - Optionally, if packing for office/­­school tiffin, can keep the hummus spread and veggies on the side, and put it in sandwich when eating. This keeps the sandwich crisp and fresh. Makes a very happy, healthy, cute looking sandwich for children’s school tiffin. The post Pita Sandwich with homemade Hummus spread appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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