vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Aloo Gobi

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

Black Bean Brownie Bites

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz










vegetarian recipes

Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free)

before yesterday Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a holiday dessert that will keep everyone happy! This recipe from Simply Quinoa is vegan AND gluten-free, so it’s great for bringing to parties for guests who have various dietary restrictions. In this video, Simply Quinoa shares how to make soft, pillowy raspberry thumbprint cookies with only a few simple ingredients, including delicious homemade jam! And as mentioned, this recipe is totally customizable if you need to swap out any ingredients to better fit your preferences. Overall, a great cookie recipe to have on hand! Here’s how the magic happens: Read the full recipe here. The post Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Kitchen Creativity

before yesterday Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017

December 11 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

HappyCow’s Ken Spector traveled to Dublin, Ireland, checked out the vegan scene, and attended and spoke at Dublin Vegfest in Dublin, Ireland on September 23+24, 2017. Ken interviewed two Irish vegans who discussed highlights from the event and provided exclusive insider vegan tips. Vegan celebrities such as strongman Patrik Baboumian attended and spoke at the event. Below is our video containing interviews and highlights: For more information see: http:/­­/­­dublinvegfest.com Watch our video here: Veg Restaurants featured in video: Soya Vegan Butcher in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­sova-vegan-butcher-dublin-53343 Veganity in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­veginity-restaurant-dublin-98189 143 V in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­143v-cork-92211 My Goodness in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­my-goodness-cork-105957 Special Thanks to the event coordinator, Pears Hussey, and to the two women Ken interviewed in the video, Dearbhla Mitchell and Tamasin MacCarthy Morrogh. The post Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017 appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

biscuit cake recipe | no bake biscuit cake | chocolate biscuit cake

December 11 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

biscuit cake recipe | no bake biscuit cake | chocolate biscuit cakebiscuit cake recipe | no bake biscuit cake | chocolate biscuit cake with step by step photo and video recipe. there are several variations and flavours of no bake biscuit cake which varies with the type of biscuits and frosting used. in this recipe i have used the popular parle g biscuits as the base which should make it healthy and tasty. moreover these cakes are eggless cakes and hence matches even non egg eaters preference. Continue reading biscuit cake recipe | no bake biscuit cake | chocolate biscuit cake at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYC

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYCOn Thursday, November 30, Meatless Monday participated in the Food as Medicine Summit held at the Hunter College New York City Food Policy Center. The summit featured expert speakers who discussed how problematic food habits have caused the number and prevalence of chronic diseases to rise. Therefore, food must also be the solution, according to the summits mission. Meatless Monday founder Sid Lerner (second from left) with (from left) Stephen Ritz, Dr. Robert Graham, and Michel Nischan. Photo by Charles Platkin. The summit kicked off with a welcome from Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, who has been outspoken in his support for Meatless Monday and healthy eating habits in NYC schools. The former police officer was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2016 but was able to put the disease into remission by switching to a healthier lifestyle that included more plant-based foods. He has been a strong proponent of bringing Meatless Monday to several schools in Brooklyn. The opening keynote address was delivered by Dr. Robert Graham, a co-founder of FRESH Med NYC who promotes the idea of food as medicine, saying there should not be just a pill for every ill. Graham discussed how the top 10 causes of death are related to food and diet. His mission stands by food as a remedy and uses dietary changes as the first approach in managing illness at FRESH Med NYC. Other speakers included Michel Nischan, chef and CEO of Wholesome Wave, and Stephen Ritz, CEO of Green Bronx Machine. Their panel discussed the impact of healthy food on children and its availability in schools. Nischans son was diagnosed with diabetes at age five; Ritz pointed out the difficulty in getting good produce in his South Bronx neighborhood. An emphasis was placed on not only getting kids interested in healthy eating at a young age but also making it fun for them to learn about it. Meatless Monday President Peggy Neu spoke to the significance of meeting education with action and putting good ideas into practice. The healthcare industry is the front line in the battle to better inform and direct people towards more healthy lifestyles and diets. Rather than using band-aid remedies for chronic illnesses, Neu said, these diseases can and should be prevented with better eating habits. Neus takeaway on the discussion of food as medicine: we need new heroes and better food choices need to be made culturally relevant. The bottom line of the Food as Medicine Summit was keeping people interested, keeping food exciting, and - most importantly - keeping people educated. The post Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYC appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic

December 10 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicVegetable Korma – Veggies in Spiced Ginger Chile SauceCreamy Indian Korma Recipe made without Onion and garlic. Vegan Indian Gluten-free Soy-free  Can be made nut-free. No Onion No Garlic Recipe. Instant pot option Weekends always have me craving Indian food, so here is this quick Korma Sauce with vegetables of choice.  There are several different types of kormas. Some are decadent, some light. Some use lots of whole spices, some use just a few and some use coconut. This korma sauce is a simple sauce made with whole spices, ginger and chili and then thickened with cashews. The sauce does not use onion and garlic as is used is many korma sauces. Some regional cuisines in India do not include certain root veggies like onion and garlic, or allium. This delicious and easy sauce has a similar flavor punch of my restaurant style Navratan korma sauce (from my first book), but simpler and without any onion and garlic. Use whichever whole spices you have and Use other nuts or coconut as sub for cashews. Lets get to this delicious Clean up the fridge Veggie Korma. Also in other news, get both my books on Kindle Matchbook DEAL, ebook version 88% off for only 2.99 on amazon US, when you get the print copy. If you already bought the print copy at any time past or present (for yourself or for gifting), you get this deal too! Head to the book page and it will automatically show you the deal if you have a print copy order in your account. Take the ebook with you on kindle, computer or your phone!Continue reading: Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicThe post Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic appeared first on Vegan Richa.

pista badam barfi recipe | pista badam burfi | badam pista barfi

December 9 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

pista badam barfi recipe | pista badam burfi | badam pista barfipista badam barfi recipe | pista badam burfi | badam pista barfi with step by step photo and video recipe. the barfi recipes are usually easy to prepare but this recipe of pista badam barfi is exceptionally easy. the combination of almonds and pistachios gels perfectly together to form a rich and flavored dry fruit fudge. moreover these burfis can be prepared within minutes and can be stored for months. Continue reading pista badam barfi recipe | pista badam burfi | badam pista barfi at Hebbar's Kitchen.

High Protein Vegan Recipes

December 8 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Liv B shares 3 high-protein recipes in this awesome recipe video. Perfect for lunch, dinner or post-workout meals! Learn how to make crispy tofu dippers (22g protein in recipe), a chickpea “tuna” sandwich (80g protein in whole recipe), and stuffed peppers (15g protein in whole recipe) in this super easy tutorial. You’ll get inspired and be able to add these filling dishes to your high-protein recipe arsenal, for when you need that extra kick. Check out the video below: Find the full recipes in the video description here. The post High Protein Vegan Recipes appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Celebrating 100 Years Since the First National Campaign to Go Meatless

December 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

At Meatless Monday, there is a reason to celebrate every week by promoting plant-based food as a way to save the planet. But in 2017, Meatless Monday had even more reason to celebrate: this year marks 100 years since the first national campaign to encourage people to go meat-free. While the original mission has evolved into something addressing todays concerns, the message has stood the test of time! In the video below, the Meatless Monday team and founder discuss the history of Meatless Monday and how it still makes an impact after 100 years. The idea of giving up meat one day a week originated in the fall of 1917 when the United States was trying to feed its citizens in the homeland as well as troops fighting abroad in World War I. It was sold as a patriotic way to support soldiers by making a simple sacrifice one day a week. Cookbooks focused on meat-free meals became a staple for housewives cooking for their families. Communities banded together to grow fruits and vegetables in Victory Gardens and learned that produce could play a starring role on the dinner table. Now, with that one day a week officially designated to Mondays, the mission of Meatless Monday has turned to saving the entire planet. By reducing meat consumption by one day a week, greenhouse gas emissions will decrease, which will reduce our carbon footprint - that is, if everyone can pitch in and get on board the way they did during WWI! Now that Meatless Monday has campaigns around the world, the impact of eating a more plant-based diet can affect the health of the planet and the people living on it. Make a difference going Meatless Monday! The post Celebrating 100 Years Since the First National Campaign to Go Meatless appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

December 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a treat from Something Vegan that will really get you in the holiday spirit — gingerbread biscotti! This crunchy, sweet snack goes perfectly with a nice mug of hot cocoa or coffee. It’s also an easy food to send as a gift to someone you love! We love that Something Vegan not only made this vegan, but also gluten-free. This recipe is a definite crowd pleaser! Check out the video below to see how to make your very own gingerbread biscotti: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

kulcha naan recipe | plain kulcha recipe | butter kulcha on tawa

December 6 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

kulcha naan recipe | plain kulcha recipe | butter kulcha on tawakulcha naan recipe | plain kulcha recipe | butter kulcha on tawa with step by step photo and video recipe. in punjab plain kulcha recipe is often served with matar chole recipe which is prepared with white peas. the combination of these 2 is often served for breakfast or for evening snacks as a street food. having said that it equally tastes great with the choice of any north indian curries or paneer curries. Continue reading kulcha naan recipe | plain kulcha recipe | butter kulcha on tawa at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Peppermint Hot Chocolate Mousse

December 5 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Feasting On Fruit‘s latest recipe video is guaranteed to satisfy all of your chocolate cravings. See how she whips up a delicious, naturally sweetened, fluffy vegan chocolate mousse in no time flat — it will have you dashing to your blender before you can say “hot chocolate”! To make this dessert even more fun, serve it up in a jar and top with vegan marshmallows and chocolate sauce. If you’re dreaming curling up on the couch with some peppermint cocoa, but it’s not cold enough to enjoy a hot drink, this mousse is the perfect alternative! Here’s how it’s made: Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Peppermint Hot Chocolate Mousse appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

mushroom tikka recipe | how to make mushroom tikka on tawa

December 5 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

mushroom tikka recipe | how to make mushroom tikka on tawamushroom tikka recipe | how to make mushroom tikka on tawa with step by step photo and video recipe. tikka recipes are always ideal party starters or entree appetisers recipes for any occasions. mushrrom tikka is one such recipe, prepared with marinated button mushrooms with other diced vegetables like capsicum and onions. it is best served with dahi mint chutney or green chutney but can also be eaten without any dips. Continue reading mushroom tikka recipe | how to make mushroom tikka on tawa at Hebbar's Kitchen.

“We Are Still In”: Meatless Monday Stands with the Coalition to Include Food in Climate Action Conversation

December 5 2017 Meatless Monday 

“We Are Still In”: Meatless Monday Stands with the Coalition to Include Food in Climate Action ConversationAn open letter extolling the values of including food in the ongoing conversation about climate change is making the rounds on Medium, and Meatless Monday plays an important role. More cities and counties on the local level in the United States have taken charge on supporting the goals of the Paris Climate Accords to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically mentioned is how the rise of meat and dairy consumption has a major impact on the climate - 14.5 percent of the worlds entire greenhouse emissions. The letter cites Meatless Monday as a strategy to reduce this impact, asking local municipalities to consider adopting Meatless Mondays in their communities. Food is rarely part of the climate change conversation, and this letter marks a positive turn for campaigns such as Meatless Monday that have been spreading the message that about reducing meat consumption and the large role it can play a big part in healing the environment. While many people are aware that a plant-based diet is good for the physical health of people, the fact that reducing meat consumption can lower our carbon footprint is mentioned far less often. Demand for meat and dairy is only projected to grow unless communities on the local level start the building the momentum to promote meat reduction. Action has been taken, but more cities and communities need to get onboard to make an even bigger impact. Cities and counties have led on climate action -- by making buildings energy-efficient, increasing electric vehicles in city fleets, and sending less waste to landfills -- but all these efforts wont be sufficient to halt climate change if we do not also significantly slash emissions embedded in the food we eat. As a major meat-eating country consuming more than twice the global average, the U.S. has a major role to play (FAOSTAT, 2013). This letter, which was co-signed by Meatless Monday and dozens of other esteemed organizations, explicitly states the need for us to reduce meat and dairy consumption in order to benefit the environment. It also cites the 16 cities that have adopted policies that steer people towards more healthy, climate-friendly food. Several cities and communities have seen Meatless Monday prove successful with their citizens. To learn more about how you can bring Meatless Monday to your community, visit the community page on our web site to find all the tools you need to start a campaign. The post “We Are Still In”: Meatless Monday Stands with the Coalition to Include Food in Climate Action Conversation appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mediterranean Brussels & Beans

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Dress up winter’s favorite miniature cabbage with sweet sun-dried tomatoes and protein-packed cannellini beans. Feta cheese and thyme lend Mediterranean flavors to this simple dish. This recipe comes to us from Sarah of So Hungry I Could Blog. Serves 2 - 15 medium-large Brussels sprouts - olive oil - sea salt or kosher salt - 1 - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked cannellini beans (about 1 can) - 1/­­2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced thin - 1/­­2 cup feta cheese, crumbled or cubed - leaves from 2-3 sprigs of fresh thymepepper Rinse the Brussels sprouts in a colander. Trim the ends of the Brussels and cut in half, length-wise. Remove the outer leaves and discard (these leaves will usually fall right off after cutting the sprouts in half). In a glass or tin baking dish, toss the Brussels in a few teaspoons of olive oil and a few pinches of salt. Roast at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Toss the sprouts and roast for an additional 15-20 minutes, or until browned and slightly crisped. While the sprouts are cooking, combine the beans, feta, tomatoes and thyme -- tossing carefully so as not to break up the cheese too much. Add the warm Brussels sprouts to the bean mixture and gently combine. Drizzle with a little extra olive oil and a sprinkle of fresh pepper before serving. Makes about 4 servings as a side dish. The post Mediterranean Brussels & Beans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

matar kulcha recipe | chole kulche recipe | kulche chole recipe

December 10 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

matar kulcha recipe | chole kulche recipe | kulche chole recipematar kulcha recipe | chole kulche recipe | kulche chole recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. even though it looks like just another curry but has a lot to offer with its combination of taste. these curries are often found more on streets rather than fine dine restaurants and hence it is termed as matar ki chaat or matar chaat. the combination of kulcha and matar chole is lip smacking but the curry can be served by itself with sev, onions and tomatoes dressing as chaat recipe. Continue reading matar kulcha recipe | chole kulche recipe | kulche chole recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. LunchSoup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. SnackApple and almond butter DinnerSoup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

potato nuggets recipe | spicy potato nuggets | potato snacks recipes

December 8 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

potato nuggets recipe | spicy potato nuggets | potato snacks recipespotato nuggets recipe | spicy potato nuggets | potato snacks recipes with step by step photo and video recipe. nuggets are popular snacks recipe served in many fast food chain today but the original recipe was chicken McNuggets started by McDonalds. it was a huge hit and hence later the recipe was adopted by many food chains with varieties of ingredients. spicy potato nuggets are one such adaptation and are huge success in india. Continue reading potato nuggets recipe | spicy potato nuggets | potato snacks recipes at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF option

December 7 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF optionVegan Pumpkin Cheesecake with graham cracker style crust. Easy Creamy Pumpkin Cheesecake to please everyone. Gluten-free with gluten free crust. Soy-free Recipe. I made this cheesecake over Thanksgiving and I think I have found my favorite holiday dessert. It is creamy, lightly tangy, pumpkiny, spicy and all things holiday, fall and dessert. Its lighter, creamier and spicier than a pumpkin pie and oh so good. This has just the right amount of pumpkin and the cheesecake flavor balance which I like much more.  Its a simple recipe. Blend the pumpkin with soaked cashews, non dairy yogurt sweetener and pumpkin pie spice. Bake to set, then chill  until ready to serve. Serve with whipped coconut cream, or vanilla ice cream or califlornia cabin (its a fabulous flavor from local Seattle vegan ice cream shop frankie and Jos). Make this cheesecake for a party or for yourself as you might not want to share! Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF optionThe post Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF option appeared first on Vegan Richa.

How to Enjoy Being Vegan While Traveling with Non-Vegans

December 6 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Enjoy Being Vegan While Traveling with Non-Vegans Going on vacation as a vegan is not as simple as booking a flight and a place to stay. You have to consider the typical cuisine of the area and the awareness and understanding of veganism, too. Here are some essential trips on how to enjoy being vegan while traveling with -- and among -- […] The post How to Enjoy Being Vegan While Traveling with Non-Vegans appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut

December 5 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut are great for holiday gift giving, and they’re a terrific addition to dessert trays at parties, too! Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, ?theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. - 1 1/­­3 cups shredded unsweetened coconut - 1/­­3 cup semisweet vegan chocolate chips - 1/­­3 cup macadamia butter - 3 tablespoons coconut milk - 2/­­3 cup confectioners sugar - Finely chop the coconut by pulsing it in a food processor. Set aside. - Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and set it over a small saucepan of simmering water until the chocolate melts. (Alternatively, melt the chocolate chips by placing them in a small microwaveable bowl and microwave on high for about 1 1/­­2 minutes, or just until the chocolate is completely melted.) Add the macadamia butter and coconut milk and blend until smooth and creamy. - Place the chocolate mixture, sugar, and 1/­­3 cup of the reserved coconut into a food processor and process until well combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls and roll them in the remaining 1 cup coconut, pressing so the coconut adheres to the truffles. Place the truffles on a platter or a baking sheet. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Khatta Meetha Chivda

December 5 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); khatta Meetha chivda Khatta Meetha chivda is a popular tea time snack. This delicious sweet and salty snack can be enjoyed by all ages. Chivda is a flat rice, also known as poha. - 2 cup chivda (or poha available in different thickness, thick, medium, thin or nylon poha, I am using medium) - 1/­­2 cup peanuts - 1/­­2 cup sugar - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp citric acid - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder - About 18 curry leaves - Also need oil to fry - Grind sugar, salt, citric acid and red chili powder together making sugar in to powder. And all the ingredients will be mixed evenly. Set aside. - Wash and pet dry curry leaves and let it air dry for at least 10 minutes or more. - In a frying pan take about 1 of oil and heat on medium heat. Oil should be moderately hot. Put about 1/­­4 cup of chivda in an oil, chivda should come up right away, (otherwise oil is not hot enough) as soon chivda comes up over oil, lower the heat to low and stir fry chivda till it doubles in size but remains white in color. Take out fried chivda in a strainer to drain out excess oil. Repeat the process and fry the remaining chivda. - In the same oil fry peanuts over low heat till they are light brown. - Fry the curry leaves until they are crisp. - Take another frying pan large enough to hold all the ingredients, put I teaspoon of oil in the pan over low heat. put turmeric stir and put chivda, keep mixing till it is mixed well and chivda will be light yellow turn off the heat and let the chivda come to room temperature. - Add peanuts, sugar mix, and crush the curry leaves over. Mix it gently until all the ingredients are incorporated well. You can store the Khatta Meetha Chivda, in a air tight container for a month. Store it in an air-tight container and enjoy this scrumptious snack for up to 2 months…!! The post Khatta Meetha Chivda appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

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